books

Book Consumption

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Guilty Confessions: 17 Books I Should Have Read

Image result for the name of the rose by umberto ecoI always have a long list of books to read, whether they are books on my bookshelf already or one of the dozens of books recommended by friends, family, professors, random people on the street… the list seems to go on and on.

And choosing which books to read and when is not always an easy decision. Do I want to read something short or long? Fiction or non-fiction? Old or new? There are so many options it can be a task in itself to choose just one.

This act of choosing which books to read also means that there have been many books that have been left unread. Books that as a self-professed reader and lover of books and especially as an English major pursuing a Masters in publishing, I’m embarrassed to admit I have not read.

Now, this year I have made some headway towards correcting these oversights. I finally read Lolita and Rebecca; Atlas Shrugged and Outliers: The Story of Success; The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead and Americana by Don DeLillo.

However, for every book that I check off my list, I’m left with dozens more still to go. So, now that we are over halfway through the year and as I am assessing my reading goal and beginning to plan out books for the remainder of the year, here is a list of 17 books (in honor of today’s date) that I am embarrassed to admit I haven’t yet read!

17 Books I’m Embarrassed I Haven’t Read

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Books, Books Everywhere!

"Please, sir, there are enough books for everyone. You don't have to run." | http://writersrelief.com: Good morning on this wonderful Monday morning (I know — wonderful and Monday seem like  an oxymoron don’t they?). I know I haven’t posted much during and since my trip to London, so I thought I’d merely give an update on the books I’ve gotten during this time (which have been many.)

And yes, the British Library was most incredible.

While in London — despite visiting many bookstores and spending hours browsing and burdening my very patient boyfriend with dozens of books — I only brought back three books (damn you luggage restrictions!). One of those books was for a friend and I’ve already given it to her, but the two I got for myself make me very excited. (more…)

4 Book-y Places to Visit in London

My London trip is fast approaching, so I have been preparing a list of things I want to do while I’m there.

One thing I am particularly excited about with this trip is — because I’ve already been there twice and gotten some of the major touristy things out of the way (so to speak — I would gladly go to the Tower of London again because that was awesome! And I have yet to visit Hampton Court — ooops….) anyway… — going to some lesser known places and really focusing my destinations on books (because I love them).

So, I’ve collected a list of book destinations for London. (more…)

Top Ten Tuesday: Books on my Spring TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature by The Broke and The Bookish. Each week has a new theme and you can participate however often you choose!

It has been a while since I’ve had the time (and dedication) to actually be up to date on my reading list. So, I’m excited to say that I actually have a lot of books I am looking forward to read this coming Spring.

Ten Books I Can’t Wait to Read This Springten books looking forward (2)

 

Book Playlist: The Revenant by Michael Punke

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The year is 1823, and the trappers of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company live a brutal frontier life. Trapping beaver, they contend daily with the threat of Indian tribes turned warlike over the white men’s encroachment on their land, and other prairie foes—like the unforgiving landscape and its creatures. Hugh Glass is among the Company’s finest men, an experienced frontiersman and an expert tracker. But when a scouting mission puts him face-to-face with a grizzly bear, he is viciously mauled and not expected to survive.

The Company’s captain dispatches two of his men to stay behind and tend to Glass before he dies, and to give him the respect of a proper burial. When the two men abandon him instead, taking his only means of protecting himself—including his precious gun and hatchet— with them, Glass is driven to survive by one desire: revenge.

With shocking grit and determination, Glass sets out crawling inch by inch across more than three thousand miles of uncharted American frontier, negotiating predators both human and not, the threat of starvation, and the agony of his horrific wounds. In Michael Punke’s hauntingly spare and gripping prose, The Revenant is a remarkable tale of obsession, the human will stretched to its limits, and the lengths that one man will go to for retribution.

~ Playlist ~

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Book Playlist: Lolita by Vladmir Nabokov

Lolita When it was published in 1955, Lolita immediately became a cause célèbre because of the freedom and sophistication with which it handled the unusual erotic predilections of its protagonist. But Vladimir Nabokov’s wise, ironic, elegant masterpiece owes its stature as one of the twentieth century’s novels of record not to the controversy its material aroused but to its author’s use of that material to tell a love story almost shocking in its beauty and tenderness.

Awe and exhilaration–along with heartbreak and mordant wit–abound in this account of the aging Humbert Humbert’s obsessive, devouring, and doomed passion for the nymphet Dolores Haze. Lolita is also the story of a hypercivilized European colliding with the cheerful barbarism of postwar America, but most of all, it is a meditation on love–love as outrage and hallucination, madness and transformation

 

~Playlist~

Intro – UNKLE

From Eden – Hozier

My Type – Saint Motel

Moon – Little People

Rabbit Heart (Raise It Up) – Florence + The Machine

Paper Girl – July Talk

Lolita – Lana Del Rey

Line of Fire – Sucre

Guts – Alex Winston

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books that Pair Well With Vivaldi

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature by The Broke and The Bookish. Each week has a new theme and you can participate however often you choose!

This week’s topic was a freebie, so I decided to have some fun with it! As you all know by now, I love books and music, so what could be better than to putting them together?

So without further ado — ten books that pair well with Vivaldi ( ♡) (Click the cover to open the youtube link with the Vivaldi piece!)

Seraphina (Seraphina, #1)The Thief (The Queen's Thief, #1)Revolution

 

Song of the SparrowA Company of SwansA Great and Terrible Beauty (Gemma Doyle, #1)Wicked Lovely (Wicked Lovely, #1)

 

Shiver (The Wolves of Mercy Falls, #1)The Night CircusA Man for All Seasons

 

 

Musings on Being Well Read

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It’s January (in case you were unaware) and that means it is once again time for New Year’s Resolutions. And for those of us who love to read that means book resolutions.

The interesting thing about January book resolutions is how it generates discussions not just about how many book a person wants to read but also about what kind of books that are going to be read in the coming year. Which centers around a quality question – what sort of books ought we to read? What book are qualitatively good? What books are important? What books are necessary to make one “well read.”

These questions are not so easy to answer. Susie Rodarme muses this question at length in her BookRiot post, “How to be Well Read”. I highly suggest reading this article, she deconstructs typical notions of being “well read” quite clearly and articulately, concluding that:

I know, that answer isn’t as easy as going through a list and ticking off boxes, though there are lists out there, if “well-read in this list of books” is what you want to tackle for your own well-read-ness (can I direct you to our Read Harder challenge for a start?). The main reason I wanted to put this maybe-unhelpful answer to this question out there is that I’ve hung around a lot of book spaces in the past where people use “well-read” as a way to keep other readers down and make themselves artificially elite. I’ve seen the term “well-read” used to keep the voices of people of color and women sidelined because they were of little interest to those striving to be traditionally well-read. I’ve seen those who think they have attained “well-read” status become stagnant and stop growing and seeking out new reading. I don’t think that it’s always necessarily a positive thing, to be “well-read” by someone else’s standards.

I think the underlying desires in wanting to be well-read are wanting to be accomplished and knowledgeable, so go out there and set some reading goals and accomplish them! You’ll pick up the knowledge along the way.

 

 

As much as I love her analysis and deconstruction of the “Literary Establishment” and its tendency to favor Western (esp. British/American) white, male authors, I still want to fight back a little bit.

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